Warping Woes

Well, I finished the first of the scarves I had planned on making for my parents’ big trip to Scotland. I have to tell you, though, this project was a big son-of-a-you-know-what. 

In case you haven’t read, I’m still a brand new, have-to-watch-the-YouTubes-all-day-to-figure-this-thing-out weaver. When I learn a new technique in knitting or crochet, or really just about almost everything I learn, I only have to watch it once or twice. I’m that weird person with that crazy kinesthetic memory. So imagine my surprise when I realize I really messed up on warping the Cricket Loom for this scarf.

My first finished Gordon Scarf. It will stay perpetually wrinkled because of the bad job I did warping the loom.

My first finished Gordon Scarf. It will stay perpetually wrinkled because of the bad job I did warping the loom.

I didn’t just mess up, I warped it completely backwards. I figured I knew what I was doing, so I never once pulled up any of the videos I had been watching on YouTube to warp this thing. And it was BACKWARDS. Plus, I mixed up the order of the steps completely. I should note that it was 2 in the morning when I was warping, which is probably why my brain was not on at all. So, after I warped it backwards, I immediately threaded the yarn through the little holes too, without tightening the warp on the other side, which is also wrong, wrong, wrong. Then I realized my mistake of warping it backwards, so I tried to fix it. Finally, everything was on the loom and I went to bed. (I’m well aware non-weavers will have no idea what I am talking about, so my advice is to watch this video by scrambling it into random segments and in reverse. You might have an idea what I did. The real weavers are probably smacking their foreheads right now.)

Pattern: Imitation of Gordon Tartan (my own version) Yarn: Cascade Heritage Sock Ravelry Project Page

Pattern: Imitation of Gordon Tartan (my own version) Yarn: Cascade Heritage Sock Ravelry Project Page

I started weaving the next day. As this is a plaid instead of a solid color, I had a bit of trouble with the color changes. I learned how to change colors, but since there are so many color changes in small plaid like this, a bunch of extra fabric was being created on one side. I still don’t know how to prevent this, so if anyone has any ideas I would gladly listen to them. I decided to leave the ends out and weave them all in later. As I kept weaving, the threads on the far left and right side became extremely tight. However, the rest of the warp was getting more and more loose. As I progressed I ended up having to adjust the middle of the warp to get the shuttle through, while praying the threads on the edges wouldn’t snap. Fortunately, they never did. For some reason, though, there was a lot less fabric on the opposite side of the color changes. I just kept using the shuttle to beat the fibers tight against each other (again, wrong) and it make a pretty significant slope on the left side. 

When I finally finished this thing, I pulled it off the loom, praying it would look okay after a wash and block. Fortunately, the warp seemed to have loosed on the edges quite a bit. Unfortunately, the great big slope on the left side remained. I spent a good two hours trying to straighten it out. After that I had all of those bugger ends to weave in. Even though this was my first plaid project, I’m definitely not proud enough of it to actually give as a gift. I have decided to keep this one for myself and try another one when I get the gumption to actually warp another one. And this time, I’ll actually watch the videos again, I promise.

Have you ever had a major blunder in your fiber arts? Please, tell me all about it! 

 

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