Episode 31 – Surprise!

Surprise! I’m trying my hand at video podcasting! If I do it again hopefully I will have a better lighting setup and camera so it doesn’t keep changing colors on you. I hope you enjoy it, though!

Fiber Stories:

Photography:

Episode 30 – Newspapers and Noses

Thank Yous:

Clicking Away:

Strokkur by Ysolda Teague

Strokkur by Ysolda Teague

Sleep Season Roving in “Snooze Fest”

Gradient Swap Socks, yarn is by KnitCircus in the Brass and Steam colorway

Gradient Swap Socks, yarn is by KnitCircus in the Brass and Steam colorway

KnitCircus Come What May Gradient

KnitCircus Come What May Gradient

Contests:

  • We have our Share the Love contest going in the Ravelry group. If someone blesses you, take the opportunity to turn it around and bless someone else! 

Life:

  • I have recently given up Facebook for a time in order to focus on connecting with people on a more substantial level. I also want to connect with you, so I am announcing the first Knitting Butterflies Virtual Knit Night – Monday, February 23rd at 6:30pm MST. Be sure to listen to the episode for instructions on how to join.
  • I also had a ladies night out that ended in something I have wanted to do for years….

Photography:

Strokkur Sweater – Finished!

This one was a quick knit, as far as sweaters go. We had a cold snap recently in Colorado, with a few days of below zero temperatures. It was during this time I decided I wanted, no, NEEDED a Lopi sweater. Something to snuggle up in and drink hot chocolate. Craftsy had a massive sale on yarn right after Christmas, so it was time for me to finally make the jump and purchase the yarn for a cozy, fair isle, yoked sweater.

Strokkur Sweater by Ysolda Teague, LettLopi yarn, knit by Emily of Knitting Butterflies Podcast

Strokkur Sweater by Ysolda Teague, LettLopi yarn, knit by Emily of Knitting Butterflies Podcast

I went back and forth over what pattern I wanted to make. I considered Sundottir by Dianna Walla from Wool People, but it seemed very tailored and fitted, and I wanted something with more ease to wear over clothing. After all, Lettlopi is very warm, but it also has a coarseness that makes me not want to wear it next to my skin at all. After picking up a third color, I decided to knit the Strokkur Sweater by Ysolda Teague. I had seen a few of these on podcasts recently and I loved how it looked, and everyone said it was very easy and knit up perfectly. 

Strokkur Sweater by Ysolda Teague, Lettlopi yarn, knit by Emily of Knitting Butterflies Podcast

Strokkur Sweater by Ysolda Teague, Lettlopi yarn, knit by Emily of Knitting Butterflies Podcast

The pattern itself was incredibly easy to understand. I worked on this project alongside a few others including a lot of spinning on my spinning wheel, so I am sure this would have easily knit up in a couple of weeks had I worked on in exclusively. It’s knit bottom up in the round, and I must be a crazy knitter because I had the hardest time getting guage on this project. The pattern calls for size US 7 needles, I ended up having to go down to 4’s to get correct guage. I went down to US 3 for the ribbing on the bottom (I really prefer to have the ribbing pull in on the hips a bit) and I used US 5 for the fair isle yoke.

By the way, the yoke was MAGICAL to knit. Seriously, I wish I could have knit that yoke over and over and over again. And again and again and again. Have I mentioned how much I love to knit fair isle in the round? It’s like magic. There are directions for two sets of short rows to lower the front yoke and neckline. I did the first set of instructions because I had no idea what was going on, but I decided not to knit the second set. As it turned out, this placed everything exactly where I wanted it.

Project Notes:
Pattern: Strokkur by Ysolda Teague
Yarn: Istex Lettlopi in teal, ivory, and lavendar
Needles: US 3, 4, and 5
Ravelry Page

Strokkur Sweater by Ysolda Teague, Lettlopi yarn, knit by Emily of Knitting Butterflies Podcast

Strokkur Sweater by Ysolda Teague, Lettlopi yarn, knit by Emily of Knitting Butterflies Podcast

The finished sweater was magical to put on. It’s not often when I take a breath when I see something on me, but I totally did this time. It ended up very, very flattering, with the yoke laying perfectly across my shoulders, and even the garter stitch collar I was so nervous about turned out perfectly. Would I knit this again? In a heartbeat! Yes! I want many many more of them in my sweater drawer! I would love to knit something like this again with a different yarn, the hand was a bit rough for me personally but I think it would be a blast to find something softer. This sweater made me want to go knit all of the yoked sweaters, and I have yarn to knit a super nerdy one. I guess I had better go and start swatching!

Also, random, my local newspaper did a story on people who didn’t watch the Superbowl, and they featured me finishing this sweater! It was my last project for the Down Cellar Studio Pigskin Party, which was a fantastic knitalong. You can find the article here.

Hitofude – Finished!

I really, really need to get better about writing about my knitting while it’s actually happening. Oh well, in the meantime, I’m enjoying catching up on sharing some of my finished objects with you!

This gorgeous sweater is the Hitofude by Hiroko Fukatsu. Truthfully, I didn’t really think of this as an “I must have it” kind of project, but everyone else was making it. I planned to purchase yarn for it at Stitches Midwest back in August, and I found some Miss Babs Katahdin in the most gorgeous purple colorway. Seriously, Babs is a genius. The layers and layers of color and texture made it so beautiful, yet subdued. I knew it would be the perfect yarn for a project whose name meant “Ink Stroke.” 

And then I put off starting it, for a few months at least. I just didn’t know if the pattern itself would be flattering on me. The area of my body I feel most self conscious about is my thighs. Let’s just say the years have not exactly been kind to them. I was worried the extra fabric around the bottom on the vertical lines on the top would make me look even more bottom heavy. I even tried one on at Stitches and still wasn’t convinced. Then National Knit A Sweater In a Month (or, NaKniSweMo) came up in November, and I decided it was time to give it a shot.

The construction is very interesting, almost like a shrug with a skirt on the bottom. I did my best with the provisional cast on but didn’t do a great job. I ended up unraveling each stitch of the waste yarn by hand instead of the nice pulling trick, but it turned out completely fine. The repeats themselves were very easy and relaxing, and I memorized them quickly. I added 2 repeats to the top half and three to the bottom, I wanted mine to be nice and long.

Project Notes:
Pattern: Hitofude by Hiroko Futkatsu
Yarn: Miss Babs Katahdin
Needles: US 6
Ravelry Page

The yarn, oh the yarn! I love the depth and the texture it created in this pattern, just enough to keep it interesting, with very little pooling and still a muted variation. It was completely my style and perfect for my wardrobe. It held up really nicely to the blocking process and shows the lace detail beautifully.

It did take me quite a bit longer than the month of November to knit this, and I finished on Christmas Eve. Although, I had a few other projects I worked on simultaneously, making it more difficult to finish on time. I wouldn’t say the actual knitting of the project was my favorite, and there were a few times I got very confused, but the finished object was completely worth it. I can already tell this is going to be a staple in my spring wardrobe, perfect for those days when it’s a bit chilly but not bitter cold. 

My husband also photographed it for me. I set the camera to Aperture priority mode with a low ISO, and set the aperture at f 2.8. This makes the sweater in focus, while everything behind me is out of focus. I am extremely please with how this sweater turned out!